Dr. Matthew Sachs logo

Tele-Psychiatrist in VA & NC
ADHD Specialist for Children, Teenagers, & Adults 
Treats Almost All Psychiatric Issues, All Ages

$275 60 min initial eval

$135 30 min follow-up

Text 757-219-2753

 Office will text you back within 24 business hours

Virginia Top Doctor 2023ADHD Specialist Double-Boarded
Child & Adolescent and Adult Psychiatrist

doctor Sachs on Zoom call

Telepsychiatry to anywhere in VA or NC

Dr. Matthew Sachs, MD is ready to take your call, a "virtual call" that is. Dr. Sachs is embarking on a new way to handle psychiatric visits in the aftermath of COVID.  Appointments can be conducted via Zoom chat sessions. This enables a safe, private and secure way to treat patients. Meet at your convenience, at your location, at a date and time you choose.

Request Appointment

patient on zoom call

ADHD Specialist

ADHD kid jumping

I have a specific interest and passion for treating children, adolescents, and adults who have suffered from ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). I've treated hundreds if not thousands of patients by now. I have successfully completely an intensive Certified ADHD Professional Clinical Provider course. There has been a stigma in treating this issue and it is hard to find help, but I am looking to break the mold and provide treatment to as many people as possible.

Child Psychiatrist

teen male on zoom call

This past year has put a specific emphasis on mental health in the child and adolescent population. I know how high the demand can be for help and the outpatient supply is very low. I hope I can make a difference in the life of a young person struggling out there. Being a father, I want everyone to be happy and healthy. I have specific interests in managing behaviors that arise from autism spectrum disorders and helping teenagers feel safe and secure and they become young adults.

Adult Psychiatrist

adult male on zoom call

There are many conditions that were swept under the rug when many adults were once children themselves. I hope now that the stigma surrounding mental health is finally subsiding, more people can seek the help they have been missing for years. I can assist in any stage of life, with almost any psychiatric issue that exists. My goal is to maximize your functioning so you can live life to its fullest potential, in peace and happiness.
 

Dr. Matthew Sachs, MD - Overview

Dr. Sachs outdoors

Education:

  • Master’s in Business Administration (M.B.A.), Umass-Amherst, 2016.
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship, University of Virginia, 2012.
  • Adult Psychiatry Residency, University of Virginia, 2010.
  • Masters of Public Health (M.P.H.) in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 2007.
  • Doctor of Medicine (M.D.), Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine (Formerly Medical College of Virginia – M.C.V.), Richmond, VA, 2006.
  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Interdisciplinary Studies, specialization in Atmospheric Chemistry, with distinction.  University of Virginia, 2001

Certifications:

  • Board Certified, Adult Psychiatry
  • Board Certified, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
  • Virginia, medical license
  • North Carolina, medical license
  • Certified ADHD Professional Clinical Provider

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TESTIMONIALS

  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Bravo. Kudos. I caught up with local current events today, and there you were, boldly and courageously challenging the rectitude of local powers that be. Iโ€™m sure legions in Hampton Roads have offered you support and encouragement, but I couldnโ€™t resist sending you my own. I wrote a lot, but deleted it allโ€ฆ.the curse of an ADDer.

    I wrote about moral compasses. And how yours points true north, for sure. And how when paired with moral intelligence, and honor (and hutzpah), itโ€™s a rare and beautiful thing to behold. It was a singular joy for me to read about you and well, everything.

    No need to respond to this email as I imagine your plate is pretty full these days. With sincere respect and warm regards, Judy M.
    – Judy M.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I had a great experience working with Dr. Sachs. He patiently listened to me and asked thoughtful follow-up questions, even going beyond the allotted time for the appointment. In response, he designed a care plan that provided immediate relief but also focused on how I could work towards a better quality of life in the long term. I canโ€™t recommend Dr. Sachs enough!
    – Carlin C
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Excellent and professional doctor. I have recommended him to my own friends and family as I have received effective care through both medications and talk therapy. Dr. Sachs provides something I have never experienced before in a counselor, therapist, or psychiatrist - an actual timeline of recovery that is quick, but not rushed and actually feeling herd, listened to, and treated like a human being and not just a paycheck. It was a quick process to become a patient and make a first appointment. Payment is easy (expensive, but health insurance may be able to reimburse you directly) and Dr. Sachs is great about keeping up with medications and swiftly addressing any mix-ups between patient/drug store/doctor. 10/10, highly recommend!
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr Sachs has been super great in handling my case. I would highly recommend him!
    – Ruth A.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I'm very grateful for the care and time that Dr Sachs took with family. Easy to talk to, thoughtful, caring and honest. Helpful recommendations and great experience overall.
    – Melissa B.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs is incredible. He puts in the extra work to make sure his patients have the best possible experience, and works hard to ensure that they get the most affordable prices as well. He really cares about his patients, and heโ€™s the first doctor Iโ€™ve had that will really go the extra mile. Canโ€™t recommend Dr. Sachs enough!
    – Talia S
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I'm a retired professional, previously diagnosed with adult ADHD and treated for many years until my 2017 retirement. Recently, I had the good fortune to seek out and connect with Dr. Sachs as I seek help and guidance resuming treatment. During this, our initial visit, he listened keenly to my history. Then he asked for clarifying input, engaged me in a collaborative discussion, and addressed various medical options along with their pros and cons. He was clearly knowledgeable (understatement) and seemed intuitive about which paths forward could work for me, yet he was neither condescending nor dismissive as he addressed, at length, my questions. As we chatted, it became clear this was to be a two-person solution-oriented relationship. I never felt like just another specimen under the microscope. If I've done anything for myself, it's connecting with Dr. Sachs for help. I don't need sugar coated back rubs, nor am I looking for someone to coddle me. He was approachable and kind of course, but his superpower was skillfully steering me towards the path lined with solutions that can work for me. It's a journey I'm eager to take with Dr. Sachs as my guide.
    – J.Marks
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    My family had never participated in any type of psychiatry services prior to our appointment with Dr. Sachs, and we will never need to look elsewhere for services because he was fantastic. Dr. Sachs spent time with us, learning our story, our history, our background and helped us dig in deep and think about things in ways that we hadn't before. His approach is straight-forward and he was willing to lead us through the hard conversations. Dr. Sachs was able to give us clear, tangible next steps and has continued to be a positive voice in our journey; and we could not be more grateful.
    – Cameron G.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs rearranged his schedule to see me and fit me in right away. Heโ€™s a fantastic psychiatrist!!
    – Christopher D.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    We quickly got an appointment with Dr. Sachs and weโ€™re able to sit on talk with him in the comfort of our own home via zoom. We had an open discussion in which we were able to make some strides on working towards growth and progress for my child. Would highly recommend!
    – Elizabeth S.
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    Dr. Sachs is consistent, thorough in determining diagnosis, and provides clear explanations to support his decision. I am confident in his abilities and would refer him to my closest friends and family.
    – Kelly B.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs is amazing! He truly cares about you and is extremely empathetic to whatever is going on in life. He explains medications well and will make you feel very comfortable with the treatment plan. He is genuine and will go out of his way to help you!
    – Annie P.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Mathew Sachs is Godโ€™s gift to the community. He is doing the Lordโ€™s work. He takes his time during appointments to really serve his patients. Not only do you leave the appointments feeling really cared about, you feel he is your rock and has your best interest in mind. It is so refreshing to come across a physician whose number one priority is being a servant of God through serving his patients. There is no number of stars that would suffice to give this physician the review he deserves. He is truly one of a kind.
    – Krystle L.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs has been great to me.... been with him since 2020.
    – James C.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs is a superb psychiatrist. He is one of the few that incorporate talk therapy in addition to medication appointments, no matter how long you've been a patient. He is laid back, but very knowledgeable and nonjudgmental. I recommend him to everyone. And I am so glad Dr. Sachs finally has his own practice! I've switched to his different practices over the years, and it's nice to know he's at his final location. Setting up your first telehealth appointment with the new practice can take a little work/tech-savvy, but after the first one, it's easy. FYI, he provides you with the claim to submit to your insurance and does not file directly. You pay for the appointment upfront (which can be pricey, see website for fees) but your insurance will reimburse you directly after you mail in the claim. Some insurances even reimburse more than what you paid upfront! If you are looking for a psychiatrist he is absolutely the best in Hampton Roads.
    – S. F.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs is easy to speak to and open up to. Heโ€™s extremely knowledgeable. I highly recommend him!
    – Marie G.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I went to him while he worked at Reboot and loved him but now that heโ€™s starting his own practice I canโ€™t be more excited!! Heโ€™s very helpful, and you can tell he cares so much about his patients and thatโ€™s all Iโ€™ve ever wanted in a doctor. When he left Reboot to start up his own practice, he took the time to personally call me and continue to give me free care which is extremely nice of him to do, and thatโ€™s how you know he cares about all of his patients. I am planning on staying with him through his new practice and I canโ€™t wait for the future of my mental health. Thank you, Dr. Sachs!!
    – Bethany H.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    He spent a lot of time with me and really got to know me. Down to earth and reasonable. Haven't met many psychiatrists like him, and I've seen a bunch.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Took the time to get to know my daughter and is helping her navigate through a very difficult period in her life. Extremely personable and respectable. Knows what he is doing.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Dr. Sachs is consistent, thorough in determining diagnosis, and provides clear explanations to support his decision. I am confident in his abilities and would refer him to my closest friends and family.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I really enjoyed my time with Dr. Sachs. I felt heard but we didn't waste any time getting to the meat of the issue.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    If you are looking for a wonderful, caring psychiatrist look no further than Dr. Sachs. He's the best!
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    The doctor was well-spoken and made me feel comfortable. Great experience!
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    Extremely satisfied with the care Dr. Sachs has given me. Would definitely recommend him to anyone who needs help and guidance.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    My first telehealth appointment was just what I needed. Very good experience.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    First time using a psychiatrist and was a great experience
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    A very good doctor that listens to your story and then decides on an approach.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    He was to the point with what I needed and guided me in the direction I should be going. I am looking forward to a long-term relationship with him so I can be the person that I once was.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    He cares and he listens. He is genuine and one of the best physicians I have ever met.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    He was able to get me on the proper meds in a short amount of time compared to the other doctor I saw for months.
    – Anonymous
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    – Michael R.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    – Mellissa M.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    First time using a psychiatrist and was a great experience.
    – Michael H.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    I'm so grateful to have Dr. Sachs for my care again. He is an excellent Dr, with such compassion for his patients. Making an appt with him was very easy. I was almost out of my maintenance meds and seen promptly. A big thank you to Dr. Sachs.
    – Heidi L.
  • ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ๐ŸŒŸ
    – Julie F.

A short introduction from
Dr. Matthew Sachs, MD

 

What's New in the Psychiatry World?

 

Hopefully, this explains why many of my patients' medications have been so hard to find. Lots of government regulations have decreased the ability for generic manufacturers to produce what I prescribe. Unfortunately, I don't know how this improves unless the regulators are replaced by those with a different opinion.
The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry just came out with a large study showing a correlation between ADHD medications and reduction in height in teenagers, however, the issue is very complicated. The study appears to have a lot of potential flaws. Since I work with so many children and teenagers with ADHD, I want you to know I stay on top of the latest research. This moonth's front page article definitely makes headlines, but if you read the fine print, there's more than meets the eye. Here are just some of the issues I've found. 1) pg 7. โ€œOur sample included only male patients and their relatives, and might not generalize to female patients.โ€ 2) pg 7. โ€œA full mechanistic understanding of why...individuals with ADHD are shorter than expected is currently lacking.โ€ The authors don't know WHY ADHD and height is correlated. 3) pg 7. Unclear hypothesis. โ€œThere are indications that children with ADHD have an increased risk of growth hormone stimulations...(but) the etiology (is not) fully known.โ€ 4) pg 8. Only yes/no answers were permitted, so they only asked if the child took ADHD medication or not. They did not record length of time on ADHD medication, dosages, or which types. 5) pg 8. Other contributing factors. โ€œThe associations between ADHD and shorter height were partly explained by socioeconomic status (financial stability, net worth, etc), prenatal care, and other psychiatric factors.โ€ 6) pg 6. Improper end point. The authors didn't know when to stop measuring height. They did not take into account puberty and growth spurts. The cut-off age was arbitrary, in other words, the children may still have been growing. 7) pg 6. Generalization. The study was only done in Sweden and only with males. One has to be careful generalizing those results to females and to the rest of the world could be problematic. It's just one country, and one gender. 8) Pages 6-8. Many other studies have proven no correlation. Lastly, to reiterate, no proven causation was found, just a correlation. And the max correlation was about 1 cm. That's 0.39 inches. When all is said and done in this study, itโ€™s not even that much.
Researchers from Amsterdam conducted a study to see whether running therapy could be as helpful as antidepressants for treating depression and anxiety symptoms. The researchers found that both groups experienced similar improvements in their depression symptoms. However, the running group also saw improvements in physical health, while the antidepressant participants experienced slightly worse physical health.
Are Screens Negatively Impacting Kids' Brains and Fueling the ADHD Epidemic? Experts Weigh In The overreliance on screens for mental health diagnoses in children is a growing concern among experts. With the increasing prevalence of depression and anxiety in children and adolescents, many healthcare providers use digital tools and apps to screen for these conditions. However, the accuracy and reliability of these screens have been called into question, with concerns being raised about the potential negative impact on children's brains. Overreliance on screens for mental health diagnoses can lead to misdiagnosis, overdiagnosis, and inappropriate treatment, negatively impacting children's psychological and physical health in the long term. The effects of screen time on brain development in children are well documented. Studies have shown that excessive screen time can lead to changes in brain structure and function, particularly in areas related to attention, language, and social cognition. Prolonged screen exposure can also lead to decreased gray matter volume, associated with lower IQ scores and poorer academic performance. These changes in brain development can have significant implications for children's mental and physical health, including an increased risk of developing ADHD, depression, and anxiety. There is a strong correlation between screen time and mental health issues in children and adolescents. Studies have shown that excessive screen time increases the risk of depression, anxiety, and other mental health problems. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children aged 2 to 5 years have one hour of screen time per day, while older children and adolescents should have no more than two hours per day. However, many children are exceeding these limits, with some spending up to seven hours per day on screens. This excessive screen time can contribute to the growing epidemic of ADHD, depression, and anxiety in children and adolescents. Limiting children's screen time and encouraging other activities, such as outdoor play, reading, and social interaction, is essential to promote healthy brain development and mental health.
Impact of Smartphone Addiction on Mental Health. In 2019, a study published in JAMA Psychiatry surveyed 6,595 American teenagers. The study found that compared to those not using social media, those using it for 30 minutes to 3 hours per day increased the risk of internalizing symptoms (including anxiety and depression) by 1.89 times. The risk increased to 2.47 times for 3 to 6 hours of daily usage and 2.83 times for more than 6 hours. The more time spent on social media, the stronger the feelings of anxiety, depression, and loneliness. A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, in July 2017, revealed that individuals who frequently check social media within a week were 2.7 times more likely to develop depression than those who checked it the least. Those spending the most time on social media had a 1.7 times higher risk of developing depression than peers spending less time. Researchers surveyed 750 young Canadians aged 16 to 30 and found that those who frequently accessed social media on their smartphones were willing to make various sacrifices to stay on social media. About 40 percent were willing to give up caffeine, alcohol, and video games; 30 percent preferred not exercising, watching TV, or dining at their favorite restaurant for a year; nearly 10 percent would accept infertility or give up a year of life; 5 percent and 3 percent were willing to lose 5 or 10 years of life, respectively; fewer than 5 percent were willing to contract sexually transmitted diseases or life-threatening conditions like cancer; and 10 percent to 15 percent were ready to gain 15 pounds, shave their heads, give up driving, stop traveling, or live without air conditioning rather than quitting social media.
A physician is held responsible for a patient's outcome. But the patient cannot choose his physician. The patient must select from a limited list chosen by the health plan. The physician does not have adequate time to be with the patient. Providers must follow benchmark standards, viz., 15 minutes for an established patient. Failure to achieve the standards can produce a scorecard that could take away hospital privileges. The regulatory burden takes away even more patient time from a physician. Before electronic prescribing, it required less than one minute to write an Rx and give it to the patient. Now (unpublished data) it takes roughly ten minutes to get through all the screens, security protocols, and data input to use e-prescribing. Keep in mind that the efficient physician has only 15 minutes total with the patient, and the doctor still must fill out insurance forms and HIPAA compliance directives! The physician cannot choose the best drug for his patient โ€” the pharmacy benefits manager chooses. During COVID, Washington decided medications for all Americans, one-size-fits-all. Physicians who tried to use their best judgment on a specific patient rather than follow Fauci edicts were stopped. Some were subject to disciplinary action, even firing. The doctor does not choose the patient's intervention. The health plan and/or insurer decides what procedure will be performed, where, who does it, when, and even if it is done. The patient or consumer does not pay the doctor or seller โ€” the third party does. Washington dictates "allowable reimbursement" and then repeatedly reduces the amount. All of the above results in an M.D. shortage that, taken to its furthest-most outcome, could and probably has lead to death by waiting and regulations, like a human "queue." Hopefully, no Americans die waiting in line for technically possible care that does not arrive in time to save them. Those statistics are hard to track. Hopefully, enough American continue to become doctors not because of the paycheck, but because of the belief in the Hippocratic Oaths and the joy of helping others.
A fascinating article on the impact of treated vs untreated ADHD and social outcomes for young adults. Basically, NOT getting ADHD treated showed a much higher increase in unemployment, education, and overall satisfaction with life. Click here to access the PDF article that just came out in a prestigious psychiatric journal this month.
A recent CVS Healthยฎ survey found that young adults and physicians continue to see the country struggling with mental health, but most Americans aren't seeking care. But 85% agree digital health services like telehealth -- offered here! -- has made mental health more accessible. Six in 10 (60%) respondents aged 18-32 say they are concerned about their mental health, and two thirds (67%) say they know a lot of people in their community that are struggling with mental health issues. Most physicians (56%) also report declining mental health among their patients. However, only 1 in 10 (12%) Americans regularly see a mental health professional like a psychiatrist, psychologist, psychotherapist, or well-being therapist. About six in 10 (58%) respondents aged 18-32 report that social media has negatively impacted their mental health, compared to just 22% of respondents age 57+.
This link shows all the drug-company producers of ADHD meds, which doses are having supply problems, but most importantly, when the supply is expected to increase. The supply seems to be improving. Not sure how frequently this page is updated, but looks to be the most accurate source of information since it's coming from the FDA.
Written by Marc Siegel, MD, a clinical professor of medicine and medical director of Doctor Radio at NYU Langone Health and a TV medical analyst: "The COVID pandemic has created a perfect storm for this problem, by sequestering and isolating our kids to the point where they increasingly seek outlets on social media and become trapped inside a world they think they can orchestrate even as they feel less in control in the real world. Multiple studies have now shown that close to 20% of our teens are depressed, and TikTok may be one way to seek out freedom, even if it embroils you unwittingly in an addictive trap. One recent Center for Countering Digital Hate study found that when researchers posed as 13-year-old users and searched and liked mental-health videos, they received potentially harmful content (including about eating disorders and self-harm) from TikTok every few minutes or more. A Canadian Journal of Psychiatry analysis of highly sought TikTok videos about ADHD found that more than half were misleading."
The past 12 months have been the worst I've ever seen in terms of the supply of generic ADHD medications for my patients. I've never seen things this sparse in my 15 years or so. The problem is highlighted in this article, and presented further in the physician-led video.
(Click on the Headline above) This is a very good op-ed article describing the importance of a doctor being able to set boundaries for their patients, help them, but not cater to specific requests. Many doctors fear being rated poorly on review sites or facing complaints from patients, but most every doctor is trying to do the right thing. Psychiatry, more than any other field, is an art. The art of medicine.
I created a comprehensive video of almost everything I know about ADHD, and how I go about choosing the right medication for a patient. This videos covers all children, teenagers, and adults. I discuss the following: 1) the clinical definition of ADHD (as documented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-version 5), 2) the different types of ADHD medications on the market, and 3) how I go about helping patients choose the best medication. Hopefully, you will come away with a greater understanding of this complex diagnosis, and you will be armed with a great deal of knowledge if/when you speak to your provider or others about ADHD. The target audience is anyone, really: patients, caregivers, advocates, students, colleagues. Knowledge is power! Feel free to make an appointment with me if you live in Virginia or North Carolina and are interested in beginning ADHD treatment. Just go to the Appointment Request Form at the top of the page, fill out some basic information, and our office will be in touch.
High use of telemental health services by patients with serious mental illness (SMI) who live in nonmetropolitan U.S. counties is associated with improvements in key outcomes, including greater posthospitalization follow-up, new research suggests.